Skip to main content

Community Action Partnership of Hennepin County reduces poverty and increases family and economic stability through direct services, education, advocacy and partnerships.

Our 2019 Impact

News & Notes

Women’s History Month began as a national celebration in March 1982 with “Women’s History Week.” Five years later in 1987, after being petitioned by the National Women’s History Project, Congress designated the month of March as “Women’s History Month.” Since then, Congress and presidents have passed additional resolutions requesting and proclamations authorizing March of each year as Women’s History Month. This month, CAP-HC will recognize and celebrate the contributions women have made to American history, starting with the resources provided by The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on WomensHistoryMonth.gov. Find a list of online events and browse virtual exhibits centered around women throughout U.S. history.

Do you know about Harriet Robinson Scott*? How about Bobby Marshall,^ Lou Bellamy,** or Sharon Sayles Belton^^? Today is the last day of Black History Month 2021, yet there’s always more to learn about the achievements and contributions of Black and African American people to the fabric of U.S. History. One resource to continue learning specifically about Black history in Minnesota is the Minnesota Historical Society’s Black History, Black Voices initiative, which curates ongoing programs, content, and resources created by members of Minnesota’s Black community. Take some time to learn about Fort Snelling, Penumbra Theatre, and more with MNHS’s curated videos and articles. Or explore other resources to keep learning about Black history. And remember to stay curious.

* Sued for freedom alongside her husband, Dred Scott, in 1846. The couple, who met while at Fort Snelling, would wait 11 years for the infamous U.S. Supreme Court case Dred Scott v. Sandford in 1857. The Dred Scott decision helped propel the country toward Civil war.
^ Of all of the great athletes in Big Ten history, he was arguably the best of all time. The former Minneapolis Central star was the first person of color to ever play football in the conference once known as the Big Nine, in 1904.
** Penumbra Theatre founder and artistic director emeritus. Penumbra Theatre creates professional productions that are artistically excellent, thought provoking, relevant, and illuminate the human condition through the prism of the African American experience.
^^ First African American and first woman to serve as Mayor of Minneapolis. The St. Paul native held the post from 1994 to 2001.

Moses. General Tubman. Minty. The African American abolitionist and suffragist Harriet Tubman was known by many names and continues to be an icon of freedom after more than 100 years. Born into slavery sometime between 1815 and 1825, she would go on to escape north to freedom, return to the south many times freeing hundreds of enslaved people, and be the first woman in the Civil War to lead an assault. Read about her life and accomplishments, browse photos, and learn about the Underground Railroad from Harriet Tubman Historical Society.
Photo: Public Domain

  • GiveMN
    GiveMN
  • United Way
    United Way
  • capnational
    capnational
  • MN Council Nonprofits
    MN Council Nonprofits
  • Smartgivers
    Smartgivers

Powered by Firespring